Skip to main content

About your Search

20121006
20121014
STATION
WHUT (Howard University Television) 23
LANGUAGE
English 23
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
," and also tonight, technology correspondent david pogue. starting this week, he takes over as host of "nova sciencenow" here on pbs. that is coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: joan walsh is an editor at large for salon and the author of a new book, "what's the matter w/white people?: why we long for a golden age that never was." she joins us tonight from new york. >> thank you, tavis. good to be back. tavis: this title is provocative. "what's the matter with white people?" >> the title has three meanings, but we get stuck on one, thanks to mitt romney and paul ryan. why does it happen that 90% of identified republicans according to the gallup poll are white in a coun
of the law enforcement agencies, new federal police with the state of the art technology and reliable people. and at the same time, decreasing a weakening process of the organized crime. we have put in jail or they die like 23 out of the 37 most wanted criminals in mexico. so from 2009 to 2012. >> rose: immigration, give us some free advice as to what would be the best immigration reform in the united states in your judgement because you have this very long border. >> first one fact which is very important, charlie, according with the pew institute, the rate of migration from mexican workers to the united states, the net ratio reached 0 in 2010 and 2011. what that means that the number of mexican workers go you will up or going north is more or less roughly exactly the same as the mexican workers going south. why? this is a factor due to good and bad reasons. the bad reasons, if you want, is the american recession. more aggressive policy on the border. 15 days ago the american policeman killed a mexican father on the border who was just on a picnic with his kids on the mexican side. probably
in business and the economy and technology and i had a front row seat for 20 years watching this. >> rose: lessons of geography, a new movie and a life stephen shepard lived in journalism when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: robert kaplan is here, he is chief geopolitical analyst and has been writing about foreign affairs for 25 years. in his latest book he says to better understand global issues we must look to a map. he examines how geography has influenced the balance of world power and how it can inform foreign policy in the future. it is called "the revenge of geography." i'm pleased to have him back on this program. welcome. >> rose: >> a pleasure to be here, charlie. >> rose: henry kissinger said-- and you put this at the top-- that "robert kaplan's research shines light on an ancient truth. geography has been the predominant factor in determinesing the fate of nations, from fay roenic egypt to the arab spring." how long have you been thinking about tht? >> my whole career as a foreign corres
at all technologies and how price comes down. think about the price of a personal computer compared with the price of a computer today or the price of a dvd player. or even mp-3 player. somebody develops the technology. other people come along, use it and it's time to buy, they can make the product cheaper and that's real what he we are doing here. in many ways the brand name drug manufacturers are luckier. because they have a legislatively protected lot of contho >>> isn't it correct and fair to say that we need both generics and we need brands? not necessarily in that order? no brands no generics but they are both needed and needed urgently? >> absolutely&they are both required for effective and efficient market for prescription drugs. >> is that really your opinion, vicky? >> yes it is. >> i got another question for you. the fda has been without a fullrs worely on the fda to permanent . >> i see i've >> absolutely.120,000 workers. it's it's an extremely important agency. do you think it's unconchenable our legislature has not solved that problem? >> we have to understand that the
their technology but still very much a technology that hasn't demonstrated what they and north korea have been claiming. when they claimed to launch satellite to extend their ballistic missile to say they could hit the u.s. some would say is not a reality yet. >> when someone is exacting a claim like, this you know what i mean washington and seoul would have factoried that in. simply the problems of the technical capacity -- >> absolutely. i think this is probably much more, if we want to explain it, a case of political rhetoric. the north feel compelled in the face of the extension of the missile capabilities and the result of the disagreement with the americans demonstrate they can respond in a way but perhaps most importantly, the military. we have seen the succession from kim oni will had a shift in central gravity. and yet the military remains an important actor in the north korean political environment, and i think what we're seeing is a government seeking to assure its key constituents and to send a signal to the outside world in the face of what they consider pressure from the south an
, the music industry, given all of the digital technology, there has to be something more than the music that drives people to you. for me, if i have a hot sun or not, and these people are turning into my life. just about the song is doing well on the charts. tavis: you mean the books, the reality tv, the clothing line. >> the lifestyle i have lived since i was a youngster and the lifestyle i have been blessed enough to walk into right now. i am delivering this lifestyle and you can't let go lifestyle. tavis: i like that. you can't bootleg a lifestyle. but is there a danger in putting out there, for your fanbase, a lifestyle you can't have. all rappers are selling a lifestyle that while they can't bootleg it, they can have it. >> i don't believe there is any human being that if he puts 100% of his time, effort, and energy into achieving a goal that it can't happen. i simply don't believe that. for people that say they never can, your faith is weak and you don't deserve to achieve it. anybody with the right amount of skill, effort, energy, and ingenuity can accomplish anything. tavis: i d
whether or not in the world we live today with all this available through technology and all you can do at your computer at your house and the minicam, howmuch of this is excuse making now where we do not at least put the project out there and try to make it happen? >> the films are being made. the industry is gone. the barriers to get it distributed at a level where you make it to this character difficult. there are three or four dozen black filmmakers in their 30's, early 40's, lay 20's, men and women in equal numbers, making beautiful films. is there an audience for them? want to prove that, the hollywood machinery will, and if they do not come, we create our own ways to do that. it is choice. people are like, i want to write a script. have you read the book? do have a final draft? and. how're you going to do that? where do you study? no. we know those people. i also know brilliant people who are making this black independent cinema, this new wave that we're calling it. a few of us are getting studios. there are tons of us and we need to find a way to reach your audience. it does not
implications? it's a congressional hearing. >> absolutely. the implications on these two chinese technology giants, one of them is the second-largest provider in terms of equipment manufacturing in the world. the other company is the fourth largest. serious implications. both have a very ambitious plans to expand their markets in the u.s. the u.s. is a large market in terms of telecommunications. both firms have seen an increase in sales of their mobile devices. the espionage peers have limited the companies being able to move into infrastructure networking. they had to unwind a purchase of a u.s. computer company because it did not win regulatory approval. one of the company's employees 1700 people in the u.s. revenue in the u.s. was $1.3 billion last year, more than double what it made in 2010. given this report suggesting the u.s. government should bar any merger of those two chinese companies in the u.s., it could have serious implications monetarywise. >> the european stability mechanism is replacing something that i don't remember. >> a big day for the euro zone. let's hope leaders ha
party. can you get unemployment under 6% and how? >> one, you cannot to do [indiscernible] technology has changed everything. the whole scenario has changed. now you have the walmarting of america where people who work or underemployed and cannot survive on his jobs. they are low paid. you have to think of short range and long range. short range, do what is supposed to be done. get jobs to build our country. infrastructure, housing done by people, give people the hammers and nails and let them build the country from the bottom up. give people the imagination so they can get into technology and utilize it to have meaningful jobs. in the long run, there have to be structuanges. everybody needs to work. everybody's passions can to their professions. we would have a whole different way of looking at jobs and what is being done by both the republicans and democrats. >> cheri honkala, your response of vice-presidential nominee for the green party? >> first of all, i want to thank you for having us on today and having this debate. what we would do is green the economy, making sure we put job
. workers at sensata technologies have set up a three week encampment called bainport across the street from the plant to protest plans to close at it and move it to china, taking 170 jobs with it. sensata is owned by bain capital, the private equity firm co-founded by republican presidential nominee mitt romney. the workers said they plan to continue the blockades of trucks removing their equipment. "democracy now!" for spoke to the workers at the republican national convention in tampa, florida, where they unsuccessfully tried to meet with romney. then we broadcast live from the worker's encampment, which they call bainport, late last month on our 100-city tour. we spoke to one of the people who was just arrested. she is 16-year-old karri penniston. >> i'm here because i am supporting my mom and everyone that works at sensata because i really think it is a big issue. people support it, but they are like, should i jump out of my body and do something bold with the rest of the people or should i just a back? i am showing people that it is ok to let loose and do something different. >> why do
. according to earth energy resources, there's now revolutionary clean technology involving, of all things, oranges. >> if you get all of this out of the ground, separate the oil from the sand, and put all the land back where it came from cleanly, that is exactly with the calgary, the behind this project says it can do with a secret formula, incredibly, involving something you can find any grocery store -- oranges >> a recipe they say can keep you talk beautiful while mining for oil. >> the company president says his patent pending process with citrus extract does the unthinkable. it takes oil from the sand, leaving no pools of toxic waste and will not permanently scar the land. >> our long-term environmental footprint is almost nil. i can say that with high degree of confidence. >> this company video shows the only byproduct is the sand itself, later used to landscape. >> if we cannot do it, then we will go back to canada. >> john weisheit, can you talk about the citrus solution? >> it is a -- it is, like pine needles make turpentine. this is the solvent the want to mix with hot water to
on technology if we want to be competitive in the world. >> why didn't we do this in the stimulus program that was enacted? >> i think we should have done more. i think the -- >> was it a commit political compromise that prevented the stimulus program being what might have met your approval. >> it was partly a political compromise. i think it was partly a misdiagnosis. >> even though republicans didn't vote for it. >> that's right. but it was partly a misdiagnosis that we were going to be facing a short-term problem and what i just described are long-term things. and they wanted to focus on things that be would short term fillers. their model was the financial sector was sick. you put it in the hospital. for a year and a half or two, then it recovers. and the economy goes on as it was before. >> even though my impression was that history has told us that it takes longer to recover from a financial recession than a recession that comes from main street. >> that's right. and i think that's only one of the failures that they made in the diagnosis of the recession. >> what was this a problem
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)